How to Score True Social Media Automation #SEMrushchat With Craig Campbell

Automation is becoming central to all channels of digital marketing, speeding up processes, adding capabilities, integrating different systems, and syncing campaigns. Social media is no different. In fact, scheduling posts with relevant content for better engagement is one of the core objectives of pretty much every social automation tool. SEMrush...
How to Score True Social Media Automation #SEMrushchat with Craig Campbell

Automation is becoming central to all channels of digital marketing, speeding up processes, adding capabilities, integrating different systems, and syncing campaigns. Social media is no different. In fact, scheduling posts with relevant content for better engagement is one of the core objectives of pretty much every social automation tool. SEMrush also has a lot of super-useful posting and tracking tools in our Social Media Toolkit.

A lot of people argue that automation takes the “social” out of social media and defeats the whole purpose of human engagement. In last Wednesday’s edition of #SEMrushchat we brought on board Craig Campbell, an SEO and digital marketing veteran who has been watching the industry for 16 years, to discuss the pros and cons of social media automation, how it affects your engagement, and the factors on which to base your automation decisions. Here is what Craig and our other chat participants had to say:

Q1. In your opinion, is it possible to really score true social media automation? Why or why not?

Craig firmly believes that you can never fully automate social media. Engagement is one of the most critical components of the social mix, and it is something no one can really mechanize. However, you can certainly set up automation for routine tasks such as following and unfollowing, which will free up time for more interaction with your audience.

A1. ( 1/2 ) You can never fully automated everything as engagement is important, interacting with your audience is vital and that can’t really be automated IMO. But you can automate a lot of the grunt work. #semrushchat

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

A1. ( 2/2) So automating the follow, unfollow and all of that stuff can be done which frees up a lot of time to interact properly. #semrushchat

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

Many #SEMrushchatters echoed that sentiment. Automation is fine when it comes to DMs, scheduling, follow up responses, finding and evaluating users with similar interests, identifying bots, and so on, but human interaction seems impersonal and beyond the reach of automation at the moment. Therefore, businesses should be ever-prepared to respond to events and queries in real-time.

A1 while we wont be able to automate the human interactions - i'd like to see automation for
- finding relevant users
- user evaluation to keep/ remove
- bot sniffers#semrushchat

— JP Sherman (@jpsherman) August 1, 2018

A1. Honestly, I'm skeptical. For businesses, scheduling tweets & automating DM and follow responses can be useful, but without a personal follow up by a human to customers it feels like just another "your call is important to us" #SEMrushchat

— Amy Card (@amy_card89) August 1, 2018

A1: We can automate most stuff, but we can't automate the most important stuff: real-time engagement. #SEMRushChat

— Narmadhaa (@s_narmadhaa) August 1, 2018

A1: Any high-performing business on social media should be reacting to events in real-time. Plan posts about evergeen content and ideas...But know that there's no way to fully automate for current events!
#semrushchat

— Perfect Search Media (@Perfect_Search) August 1, 2018

Some experienced marketers believe it is entirely possible to automate most social campaigns (marketing automation is nothing new), although you still need to keep your eyes and ears open for unpredictable stuff. You need to design your own interaction model, and content producers have demonstrated this very well. You could also plan your campaigns well in advance with automation, albeit with genuine messaging; this frees up more time for you to interact with your audience.

A1: it's very possible, but it takes a different type of interaction model. Content producers can do this well (media). You still have to listen between the automation tho. #SEMrushchat

— Steve Hammer (@armondhammer) August 1, 2018

A1 Absolutely - been able to automate all sorts of aspects for years. Means you can plan out a campaign to hit at the audience peak times. I used to do it from a site - add an event and it would set up tweets a week before and a day before the event.#SEMRushChat

— Simon Cox (@simoncox) August 1, 2018

A1. In some aspects I think you can do social media automation but to get real engagement - it needs to be genuine. #semrushchat

— Nathan Driver (@natedriver) August 1, 2018

A1 Automation gives you time to interact with your audience while the boiler plate messages are auto sent out. #SEMRushChat

— Simon Cox (@simoncox) August 1, 2018

Others believe social media automation is a double-edged sword. There is a truckload of tools and apps that execute and manage repetitive tasks for you –  like SEMrush’s Social Media Poster lets you fill it and forget it (your timeline, silly!). Eliminating humans from the equation could sound the death knell for your social strategy. Dean Brady even wondered aloud how a bot would handle #SEMrushchat!

A1: Yes & No for social media automation, there are Tools & Apps for management, content, signals, that save monotonous tasks. But it still needs Human input as I don't like interfacing with AI Bots #SEMrushchat @craigcampbell03 @semrush HAL 9000: Good morning, Craig.

— Alexis Huddart (@Flexoid) August 1, 2018

A1: That's a double edged sword. It's definitely possible to have tools firing off your messages, but you'll always need that human element. Social is about connecting ~people~. Removing humans too far from that equation could spell disaster for social strategy. #SEMrushchat

— CallRail (@CallRail) August 1, 2018

A1-2: Odd thought.. how would my “Automation” be handling this TweetChat right now? #SEMrushchat

— Dean Brady (@deanbrady) August 1, 2018

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Q2. How do you automate your social media marketing, without having to sacrifice being engaged in conversations with your audience?

No one likes to talk to robots. Craig uses chatbots to break the ice and then takes over the conversation himself. And he plans to do that until the bots get smart enough to carry out a full conversation themselves.

A2. ( 1/2) Well no-one wants to sound like a robot, so adding personalisation and engaging manually is the way I do it. For example I use chatbots to make the introduction then I take over and add the personal touch.

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

A2. ( 2/2 ) This is the only way you will have any success, a chatbot isn’t clever enough to hold a full conversation just yet. So I use bots as an introduction. #semrushchat

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

Part of the answer is to do both – free up your time with automation and use that time to engage more with your audience. Automate the broadcasts, not the interactions. Use tools to leverage best practices, but you need to manually stay on top of customer service queries and follow-ups, interpret interactions and react to them.

A2: As @simoncox already hinted at, the answer is to do both. Let automation free up your schedule to engage more with your audience in real time. #semrushchat

— Perfect Search Media (@Perfect_Search) August 1, 2018

A2) Automate the broadcast activities. Don't automate the interactions (at least until AI gets to imitate me convincingly).#semrushchat

— David Rosam (@davidrosam) August 1, 2018

A2: So many tools now can help you identify best time/day to interact and leverage best practices etc. But you still need to be part of the process to analyze, interpret and react appropriately. #semrushchat

— Dean Brady (@deanbrady) August 1, 2018

A2. Continue to monitor your accounts, check scheduled posts and make sure to support customer services where needed. Bots are great to filter through DMs, but someone needs to follow up! #semrushchat

— Sarah Marks (@_ofwanderings) August 1, 2018

Some relatively advanced stuff that you can automate is identifying the best times your audience is active, creating conversation points, and then continuing the discussion later by following up with them. You can also reach and track audiences you otherwise couldn't with automated ads and content releases. Make sure your audience knows you are tracking these conversations, though, or else you risk creeping them out!

A2. By looking at the prime time the audience/followers/etc are active and creating a conversation point - then engaging with them to follow-up#semrushchat

— Nathan Driver (@natedriver) August 1, 2018

A2: Use scheduled posts to reach audiences you otherwise couldn't (e.g. different time zone) but make it clear to them when you'll be monitoring. Automate e.g your ads & content releases, but only when available to engage with responses in reasonable timeframe. #SEMrushchat

— Amy Card (@amy_card89) August 1, 2018

And even then, I'd be cautious. Google's latest AI tech has creeps me out. As a business, I wouldn't want to creep potential customers. #SEMRushChat - A2

— Narmadhaa (@s_narmadhaa) August 1, 2018

Our regulars chimed in with insights on how they automate their social tasks. Express Writers use Meet Edgar to schedule promotional content but balance it out by joining Twitter chats. CallRail - @CallRail uses SproutSocial for analytics and post planning. Thomas Zickell - @ThomasZickell is of the opinion that it doesn’t hurt to post all your content on social media and uses CoSchedule to get his content out there. Marccx Media - @marccxmedia also automates social sharing of their content bi-weekly.

A2: We schedule our promotional content on social media with @MeetEdgar, but it's still a priority to check-in with our audience.

For instance, I still join Twitter chats regularly as a way to connect with new people.

It's important to find a balance. #semrushchat

— Express Writers (@ExpWriters) August 1, 2018

A2: I can't say this enough—@SproutSocial has been a godsend for our strategy. The robust analytics gives us so much actionable data, and allows us to plan posts far in advance. This gives us the space to meaningfully engage in the moment. We ❤️ Sprout! #SEMrushchat

— CallRail (@CallRail) August 1, 2018

A2: Well, I think it's beneficial to post anything that you have created on social media just to get the content out to more eyeballs. I also think engagement goes hand-in-hand but with the numbers on social, you would be crazy not to post content. I like Coschedule #SEMrushchat

— Thomas Zickell (@thomaszickell) August 1, 2018

A2: We automate the bi-weekly publishing of our blog content and the social sharing of said content. #SEMRushChat

— Marccx Media (@marccxmedia) August 1, 2018

It is essential to add that personal touch and handle all conversational replies and interactions yourself. People like to be fully involved in their conversations – online or offline – to catch all the thoughts behind the dialog.

A2: I schedule posts I've read and thought others will enjoy. I reply to engagements on my tweets and participate in chats to learn new stuff and stay active. #SEMRushChat

— Narmadhaa (@s_narmadhaa) August 1, 2018

A2: You should never sacrifice actual conversations! You can automate "bulk" things, but you should never replace the personal touch you can give with automating/DMs/etc.#semrushchat https://t.co/Ds1zQ83nLe

— ThinkSEM (@ThinkSEM) August 1, 2018

A2 I like to be all in when I am holding a conversation with someone, regardless of whether it is face-to-face or on Twitter, and would prefer not to automate the conversation, nor the thought behind it. #SEMRushChat

— Bill Slawski ⚓ (@bill_slawski) August 1, 2018

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Q3. What are some benefits to automating your social media? What are the downfalls?

If you get your automation and manual mix right, there are no real pitfalls, and you can very well build your audience on social media. Beware – too much automation will leave you looking daft!

A3. There is no real downfalls automating the audience building is simple and easy, mixed in with manual interaction you can’t really go to far wrong. But you 100% need that manual interaction. But you can look daft if you automate too much #semrushchat

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

The benefits of social media automation include a steady stream of content for your followers to consume, while you are not really in front of them, or not even online. You will also improve your response times and save a huge amount of time and money this way. Mainly, you get all the grunt work off your desk and focus on manual relationship building.

A3: You can keep a consistent production of content to your followers! It's important to make sure not to drown your followers with repetitive, spammy or disingenuous posts #semrushchat pic.twitter.com/OBZeeMCthZ

— iPages CMS (@iPagesCMS) August 1, 2018

A3: The main benefit is scheduling a number of tweets in advance. The main downside is when there's an issue with the link that we notice after the tweet is published. #SEMRushChat

— Marccx Media (@marccxmedia) August 1, 2018

A3: You'll save time, which is a huge benefit. No one has the ability to be on social media all day, every day when there are other tasks to be done.

On the downside, you can't schedule everything and walk away. You have to be present and engage with people. #semrushchat

— Express Writers (@ExpWriters) August 1, 2018

A3: Benefits:
1. Regular updates
2. Engagement
3. Online presence
4. Involvement
Downfalls:
1. While automatically the post, sometime it may happen false information/update. #Semrushchat

— Veeraeswari (@VeeraeswariS) August 1, 2018

A3) Doing the grunt work, just like most technology. So you'll save time and money.

And be able to sleep (just a small benefit, that).

Fast response. Should cope well with overload.#semrushchat

— David Rosam (@davidrosam) August 1, 2018

A3: Time! Oh man, the time! Having a steady flow of content firing off gives us the space to adjust strategy on the fly as needed and engage. No downfalls come to mind. It gives you the capacity to do less grunt work and more relationship building with your audience. #SEMrushchat

— CallRail (@CallRail) August 1, 2018

You can’t just schedule and walk away from managing your social pages, or you will lose the personal touch with your audience and look like a robot. Your posts will quickly deteriorate into spam, your responses will come across as cold and fake, and you risk losing a big chunk of your followers. Fix this by adding fresh content manually.

A3: automation helps you stay in front of your audience even when you’re not online. However, if used incorrectly it can devalue your efforts and come off as SPAM. #SEMRushChat

— Maria Marchewka (@_MariaMarchewka) August 1, 2018

A3: Benefits = save time (thus money) by not spending time on the mundane that can be scheduled.

Downfalls = lose that personal touch of 1:1 interaction, conversation...i.e., the "social" part of the media ;)#semrushchat https://t.co/2ghvLxQfA7

— ThinkSEM (@ThinkSEM) August 1, 2018

A3-2 Downfalls, might become or look “too” automated to your audience. Might miss out on human interpretations that software still can’t understand. Real-time context is lost. #semrushchat

— Dean Brady (@deanbrady) August 1, 2018

A3: Downfalls: You loose hundreds of thousands of followers if you get it wrong...
Benefits: You can afford new hair 😂#semrushchat

— Andy Drinkwater (@iqseo) August 1, 2018

A3. Benefits: Saves time for better engaging
Downfalls: Same messages used could come across as cold and not genuine. #semrushchat

— Nathan Driver (@natedriver) August 1, 2018

A3: Benefits = time efficiency and social media channels that never sleep!
Downfalls = coming off as a robot, posting time-insensitive content, and missing out on interpersonal exchanges. Fix it by pulling fresh content in addition to your automated routine! #semrushchat

— Perfect Search Media (@Perfect_Search) August 1, 2018

You should use automation to set up mundane tasks that can be followed with simple instructions; this could include consistent communication and support in addition to social media management. Machine learning will help you connect with your audience better. Other unique benefits are brand consistency, unified tracking, and data portability.

A3-1: Like any automation, it should do the repeatable, mundane things that I might screw up. Things that have a simple instruction set to follow. It also can take advantage of machine learning etc to understand audience behavior to improve on those things. #semrushchat https://t.co/fjaaHjntoz

— Dean Brady (@deanbrady) August 1, 2018

A3. Lending a helping hand! Consistent comms support, freeing your team up for 'on the ground' and 'behind the scenes' content = more authentic digital presence #SEMrushchat

— Sarah Marks (@_ofwanderings) August 1, 2018

A3: Automation of social media can free time, remove monotonous tasks do a lot of leg work & management tasks for you, better coverage of platforms, but it can have holes as its not human and create more work for it being good. #SEMrushchat @craigcampbell03 @semrush

— Alexis Huddart (@Flexoid) August 1, 2018

A3. Some uncommon values.
Brand consistency & control, unified tracking, data portability, constant execution.
Some problems.
Stop being human, sounding repetitive, lack of visibility on qualitative brand experience. #SEMRushchat

— Blas Giffuni (@BGiffuni) August 1, 2018

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Q4. With the rise in social media bots and automation, do you think social media managers should be worried about their jobs? Why or why not?

Craig doesn’t see any clear and present danger to social media managers’ jobs. After all, someone has to operate the tools and approve budgets! However, social media teams will definitely get leaner as automation becomes more common.

A4. ( 1/2 ) I’m not sure manager jobs are at risk just yet, as someone has to manage the tools, and if they also do paid and manual interaction you still need someone to do all of this…..

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

A4. 2/2 But I see social media teams getting smaller with automation so jobs will be lost as automation comes into play. #semrushchat

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

At the moment, it is indeed hard to foresee robots replacing humans at what they exhibit best – humanity! Bots are still a long way off from being able to talk like real people. The “human element” is critical for real conversation.

A4: Sorry robots, but it's hard to foresee a future that replaces the adaptability and warmth of human exchanges. Social media bots can do a bang-up job at what they're created to do, but they currently lack the humanity needed to excel. #semrushchat

— Perfect Search Media (@Perfect_Search) August 1, 2018

A4: No. I mean, someone still has to set-up and manage those bots, right? We still need to make sure they're functioning properly.

But in the end, a social media bot just doesn't compare to talking to a real person. #semrushchat

— Express Writers (@ExpWriters) August 1, 2018

A4: They shouldn't be worried..yet! At the moment, bots and automation can be used for temporary social media success, however, in the long run, social media requires human interaction, and the bots available at the moment just can't replicate that. #semrushchat pic.twitter.com/C81cMIavJy

— iPages CMS (@iPagesCMS) August 1, 2018

A4: Psh, no. Even though automation is becoming ever more popular, someone has to set up said automating...plus there still has to be that human element for conversation.#semrushchat https://t.co/lK8HHTAHtL

— ThinkSEM (@ThinkSEM) August 1, 2018

Social media management is a job that requires an experienced, multi-faceted personality to perform. Therefore, while the bot threat isn’t imminent, social media managers shouldn’t just sit there twiddling their thumbs. They will have to reinvent themselves as well as their roles. They should accept and adapt quickly to changes in technology.

A4. I wouldn’t be. Social Media Managers know management is no more a soft skill and one that is difficult and takes a multi-faceted experienced individual to manage, scale and ultimately perform. The channel is too important. #SEMrushChat 🤷🏼‍♂️🏄🏼‍♂️❤️👌💯

— CoryHenke (@coryhenke) August 1, 2018

A4) Yes. They will have to reinvent themselves and their jobs.

But that's the same for all of us. And has been since we came under the thumb of big tech.#semrushchat

— David Rosam (@davidrosam) August 1, 2018

A4: I think social media managers should focus more on adopting these new technologies. Like it or not, they are the future. We can complain, but refusing to adapt won't end well. #SEMRushChat

— Narmadhaa (@s_narmadhaa) August 1, 2018

In any job, the practitioner becomes more skilled over time, as the nature of the work changes. In this, the changing profile of a social media manager follows a similar trajectory to that of an SEO specialist. Mark Traphagen wrote a great post on Marketing Land about the lessons social media managers can learn from SEO and evolve before their roles become irrelevant.

A4: No. Just like most professions, the practitioner becomes more skilled and specific. The job will change over time but what job hasn’t? SEO sure isn’t the same job it was 5+ years ago. #SEMrushChat https://t.co/UA4liCSA5L

— Dean Brady (@deanbrady) August 1, 2018

A4: This is the same old argument for seo 15yr ago & now social media.
Yes if your pants and your work is low level, ultimately it still needs a discursive & knowledgeable person for its management so no never. #SEMrushchat @craigcampbell03 @semrush

— Alexis Huddart (@Flexoid) August 1, 2018

A4. I'm just going to refer to @marktraphagen post about the growth path for social media marketing. #SEMRushchat https://t.co/VKOH36AHJ1

— Blas Giffuni (@BGiffuni) August 1, 2018

Ultimately, there will be extremities at either end of the robot-human spectrum. Bots following a script could be hacked and rendered ridiculous, like Microsoft’s Taye. Or, maybe the bots just want us to think that we are smarter than them. For now.

A4 If social interactions could be reasonably well performed by robots following some script, there's still room for calamities such as Microsoft's racist Taye. I don't think social media managers need to fear being replaced quite yet. #SEMRushChat

— Bill Slawski ⚓ (@bill_slawski) August 1, 2018

A4: Nah because the human always wins, or is that what the bots want us to think ? #semrushchat

— Tim Capper (@GuideTwit) August 1, 2018

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Q5. In your opinion, how much social media automation is too much?

This question begs an “it depends” answer. One rule of thumb is to aim to engage manually and automate pretty much everything else. At the same time, keep in mind the automation limits that social platforms have in place; that is key to maintaining a natural and realistic presence.

A5. ( 1/3 )This depends on what your automating, as I’ve said before manual engagement is key, but I see no real reason not to automate much of the other stuff at scale…..

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

A5. ( 2/3 ) But you need to be aware that social platforms have limits for example you wouldn’t follow more than say 750 people per day on twitter. As you would hit their limits and potentially get banned.

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

A5. ( 3/3 ) so get to know the limits, its about keeping it natural looking and realistic where possible. #semrushchat

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

The cardinal rule of stopping automation is when it is obvious that it is too much. If your audience can tell that your posts are automated, you have already crossed the line. Some accounts rely so much on automation that the real human behind the brand eventually gets sidelined. If you are flooding their timelines, you need to go into reverse gear immediately. People can smell fake posts from miles away, and once you lose credibility and trust, it is very difficult to regain it.

A5: 27. 27 is always too much.

When you start to look like your automating everything…. #semrushchat https://t.co/dNz8eGaSYt

— Dean Brady (@deanbrady) August 1, 2018

A5: If your audience can tell it's automated, you've gone too far. #semrushchat

— Perfect Search Media (@Perfect_Search) August 1, 2018

A5: When you rely on automation so much that you - a human - can't get a word in edgewise! #SEMrushchat

— Amy Card (@amy_card89) August 1, 2018

A5: If you're flooding the feeds of your followers, it's time to scale back. And if you're relying solely on automation to do the work for you, it's time to scale back. #semrushchat

— Express Writers (@ExpWriters) August 1, 2018

A5. When it's overused. Unnecessarily so. People smell a fake and they value authenticity. #semrushchat pic.twitter.com/GWSxRaVBur

— Sarah Marks (@_ofwanderings) August 1, 2018

It is very difficult to quantify the “right” amount of automation when it comes to social media. Too much of it dilutes your brand’s social value by diluting the quality of your interactions. So, it is best to stop at scheduling posts and take the manual route for all direct engagement. You can then look for feedback on brand sentiment from the trends of responses you are getting.

A5) How can I quantify? Or shall just wave my hands and point? :-)

I guess too much is when automation lessens the quality and quantity of your brand's social interactions. And starts diluting your brand's value.#semrushchat

— David Rosam (@davidrosam) August 1, 2018

A5: Social Media Automation, I'm 50/50 some is good and some I'm with the tolpuddle martyrs in the sense of AI bots like HAL9000 #SEMrushchat @craigcampbell03 @semrush

— Alexis Huddart (@Flexoid) August 1, 2018

A5: Stop at scheduling posts. All direct engagement with your audience should be genuine human interaction, automated replies can come across as rude and dismissive. #semrushchat

— iPages CMS (@iPagesCMS) August 1, 2018

A5. Looking at the trends of responses from the public - how are followers engaging (positive vs. negatively); or just 42...that's the answer to everything anyway#semrushchat pic.twitter.com/Si7H1JvvWn

— Nathan Driver (@natedriver) August 1, 2018

A couple of tweeps also recounted their experiences with brands that overdid automation over email as well as social media. Unfortunately, eager newbies who follow “influencers” in the hope of learning something new run into the same old recycled posts on a baby-feeding schedule.

A5 I had a welcome set of emails supposedly from one of the founders of a food delivery service - but they read like a drip campaign. I called him out on it and he wrote back immediately apologising - going to review! He must be bored of it though.#SEMRushChat

— Simon Cox (@simoncox) August 1, 2018

A5 I’ve been following some influential people here and I truly wanted to engage and learn from them but instead I actually realized how everything they post is mostly automated. Their posts have baby feeding schedules: every 4 hours recycled stuff so it’s too much #SEMrushchat

— Kate P Design (@KatePDesign1) August 1, 2018

Empathy is a very human quality and difficult to reproduce. The human touch is priceless; this is why it is so crucial for brands not to sound like a robot; it absorbs your whole brand personality.

A5 When it is not supporting your brand correctly. As everyone has said, that human touch is worth every penny, and as yet empathy is difficult to reproduce*.

*Unless your brand is robotic.#SEMRushChat

— Simon Cox (@simoncox) August 1, 2018

A5: When the entire account is automated -- DMs for any comments/interection, no personal "voice" behind the curtain (or in front of it), and the entire experience feels like a robot is controlling it, vs a real person.#semrushchat https://t.co/PbY3CGLgbQ

— ThinkSEM (@ThinkSEM) August 1, 2018

A5 When automation subsumes your personality to benefit convenience and punctuality, and you start becoming robotic in your interactions with others, automation may have gone too far. Call me Mr. Robot. #SEMRushChat

— Bill Slawski ⚓ (@bill_slawski) August 1, 2018

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Q6. What are your favorite tools for automating your social media process?

Of course, a discussion on social media tools has to begin with our very own Social Media Tracker that helps you develop a winning social strategy, track results, and build amazing reports.

Here is Craig’s list (pun intended) of favorites:

  • Contentcal for scheduling posts

  • Linkedhelper for LinkedIn automation

  • Jarvee for automating other social accounts

  • Fuelgram for Instagram (other than automation)

  • Circleboom for Twitter (other than automation)

A6. ( 1/2 )Tools I use would be @contentcal for scheduling posts, Linkedhelper for LinkedIn Automation, @jarvee for all other social accounts.

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

A6. 2/2 But there are other good tools ( not automation ) like fuelgram for Instagram, @circleboom for twitter are tools I also use. These help with other areas so check them out #semrushchat

— Craig Campbell (@craigcampbell03) August 1, 2018

Hootsuite was the clear leader among tools that other users preferred.

A6: We'll always shoutout @hootsuite! #semrushchat

— Perfect Search Media (@Perfect_Search) August 1, 2018

A6: We primarily use @Hootsuite for scheduling our Tweets! #SEMRushChat

— Marccx Media (@marccxmedia) August 1, 2018

The depth of experience of #SEMrushchatters was in full display here as they rattled off an endless list of social media posting, scheduling, and monitoring tools:

A6: Tools I like
Sproutsocial
HubSpot Social
SEMRush Social tool
Followerwonk
Agora Pulse
CoSchedule
Buffer
Likeable Hub
Hootsuite
Zapier
Social Oomph
Social Flow
Curata
Feedly
dlvr(.)it
Scoop(.)it #SEMrushchat

— Thomas Zickell (@thomaszickell) August 1, 2018

A6: So many. Sprout, Hootsuite, Buffer, Kapost.

Some decent up and comers as well, Crowdfire, Plannable, Content Studio, missinglttr, Amplifier, PromoRepublic, etc. A little rough around the edges on some though.

I miss you SocialBro! (Now @Audiense) #semrushchat https://t.co/W5ws53C4Y8

— Dean Brady (@deanbrady) August 1, 2018

A6. We use eClincher for the organization, time-saving, and engagement benefits. #SEMRushChat

— pair Networks (@pairnetworks) August 1, 2018

A6. Serious) @buffer, @hootsuite, @feedly, @ifttt, @zapier and whatever I'm trying out at the time.#semrushchat

— David Rosam (@davidrosam) August 1, 2018

A6: We love using Crowdfire, it's especially helpful after we connected our blog, YouTube, and Instagram so that we have a stream of content that we can schedule posts for! #semrushchat

— iPages CMS (@iPagesCMS) August 1, 2018

A6 Hootsuite and buffer have long been favourites but I am sure there are sheds loads of services around now. Not forgetting ifthisthenthat https://t.co/TmABFxokgj which I don’t use enough.#SEMRushChat

— Simon Cox (@simoncox) August 1, 2018

A6. @SocialAssurance @socialnewsdesk @SproutSocial @buffer @hootsuite ...just to name a few#semrushchat

— Nathan Driver (@natedriver) August 1, 2018

And if all that is not enough, a recommended post on Jeffbullas.com outlining the best social media automation tools at the moment.

A6: Social Media Automation Tools @jeffbullas did a nice list for 2018 https://t.co/nzvmsJtc49#SEMrushchat @craigcampbell03 @semrush

— Alexis Huddart (@Flexoid) August 1, 2018

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That was another whirlwind of a #SEMrushchat. We managed to get in six questions this time, and the number of tools we heard of was absolutely mind-numbing. We are still listening in the comments for your take on social media automation, how you feel about it, what tools, if any, do you use to automate your posts, how you track the results, etc. It is never too late to join the #SEMrushchat party!

And if you are game for another live session on Twitter, we would love to see you next Wednesday on #SEMrushchat, where we’ll be talking about "Smarter Content Through Data That Engages" with the amazing, Grant Simmons!.

Source: www.semrush.com