Micro-Surveys: 4 Quick Ways to Capture Member Feedback

Micro-Surveys: 4 Quick Ways to Capture Member Feedback
You already know the importance of collecting member feedback, but actually doing so is MUCH easier said than done. You can create and distribute surveys all day long, but if your members don’t complete them, well...you’re a bit stuck.<br />Enter micro-surveys. Micro-surveys are incredibly short surveys (think one to three questions) designed to capture...
You already know the importance of collecting member feedback, but actually doing so is MUCH easier said than done. You can create and distribute surveys all day long, but if your members don’t complete them, well...you’re a bit stuck.

Enter micro-surveys. Micro-surveys are incredibly short surveys (think one to three questions) designed to capture quick feedback. And what’s great about them is not only are they easy for your members to fill out, but they’re also easy for you create.

Below are four outlets for experimenting with micro-surveys:

1. Twitter polls

Is your association or chamber active on Twitter? If so, you can easily take advantage of Twitter’s polling feature to quickly collect member feedback (and prospect feedback, since in this case, your poll is open to anyone who may follow you). Twitter polls are limited to one question with up to four choices.

So questions you may consider asking include:

  • What industry-related topic are you most interested in at the moment?
  • What are you most looking forward to at our 2019 Annual Meeting?
  • What’s your biggest professional challenge at the moment?
  • What would you like to see more of from [Organization Name]?

As you’re experimenting with these twitter polls, try publishing at different times, including different hashtags, being a little playful in your language - see what people respond best to, then take it from there!

2. Instagram polls

Did you know that through Instagram Stories, you can also conduct quick two-response-option polls? These are becoming increasingly popular as Instagram Stories are becoming increasingly popular. Plus, because you’re limited to only two response options, they’re incredibly easy to create! (Here’s a step-by-step guide from Social Media Examiner for how to create polls in Instagram Stories.)

Not sure what types of questions you would even ask? Here are a few to consider:

  • Would you like to see more networking opportunities at our Annual Meeting?
  • Swag poll! T-shirts or power banks?
  • Are you a fan of the [X] trend? (“X” being something that’s going on in your particular industry.)

Get creative here! Instagram is definitely a platform that allows you to have a little more fun.

3. “Question of the Week” newsletter blurbs

If your organization sends out a weekly or monthly e-newsletter, try incorporating a “Question of the Week.” It could be as simple as you stating the question right there in the email, and then when someone clicks on the call-to-action associated with it, it would take them to a form with just that one question they could fill out. (You could easily set this up using SurveyMonkey or Google Forms.)

Promoting it as just a one question survey boosts the likelihood of people actually filling it out. And as far as questions go, you could ask whatever you want, but one approach would be to treat it like a member satisfaction survey, but piecemeal!

4. Table surveys

Think of some of your existing events - your breakfasts, your luncheons, your annual conference, etc. Chances are, at some point during those events, your members are sitting at a table (eating, chatting, maybe waiting for a presentation to start). Use that as an opportunity to gather some quick feedback. Consider placing micro-surveys (again, one to three questions, tops) along with pens on the tables so that members might fill them out while they’re just sitting there for a few minutes. (You may even want to place a glass jar or something on the table where they can drop the completed surveys in, so they know their responses will be confidential and not associated with wherever they were sitting.)

If people don’t fill them out, no harm, no foul. But even if just a few do, hey, that’s valuable feedback that you didn’t have before!

The whole point of gathering member feedback is to be able to make positive changes to your organization that will improve the member experience. A better member experience means a better chance they’ll renew.

Source: blog.memberclicks.com